Department of Chemistry

Diversity

The Waters Group 2007

At the Department of Chemistry, we feel strongly that diversity is crucial to our pursuit of academic excellence, and we are deeply committed to creating a diverse and inclusive community.

We support UNC's policy, which states that "the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is committed to equality of opportunity and pledges that it will not practice or permit discrimination in employment on the basis of race, color, gender, national origin, age, religion, creed, disability, veteran's status, sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression."

 

Commitment

Old Well

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has a long-held tradition of striving for excellence. A critical element for any twenty-first century educational institution is a diverse and inclusive community.

The vision of the Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs is to build and sustain an inclusive campus community and to foster a welcoming climate that values and respects all members of the University community. The mission of the Office affirms the University's commitment to diversity as a critical element of academic excellence.

 

Inclusion

Students

The University of North Carolina has excellent opportunities for postdoctoral researchers from underrepresented groups interested in faculty positions.

The Carolina Postdoctoral Program for Faculty Diversity encourages faculty diversity by recruiting outstanding scholars to perform postdoctoral research at UNC Chapel Hill, with the goal of training the next generation of faculty scholars. Chemists interested in this program are strongly encouraged to contact a faculty member whose research interests them. The application window typically opens in September.

Chemistry Women Mentorship Network

Carolina Professor Jillian Dempsey and Professor Brandi Cossairt with the University of Washington, have together launched the Chemistry Women Mentorship Network. The goal of the organization is to create a national network of women in academic chemistry to provide support, encouragement, and mentorship for young women considering careers in academia.

Chemistry Women Mentorship Network

You are cordially invited to join the network. Please share this information with anyone you feel will be interested.

 

Hogan Latino Diamante Awardee

Congratulations to Professor Brian Hogan on winning the Latino Diamante Award in the Advocacy Category. Diamante, Inc. of North Carolina is one of the largest Hispanic philanthropic societies in the state. The Latino Diamante Award is a statewide program created to recognize outstanding achievements and honor people, like Brian, who are making significant contributions to the Hispanic community of North Carolina.

Brian Hogan

Brian Hogan was selected from a group of over one thousand nominees statewide, because of his demonstrated commitment to increasing access for Latinos in higher education through your directorship and leadership in the Scholars' Latino Initiative. The committee was impressed with Brian's continuing efforts to work with the Latino community to promote greater participation in math and science in an effort to prepare the next generation of Hispanic scientists. Further, Brian's global efforts to bring impoverished Guatemalan youth to the United States for High School while simultaneously working in Central America to build schools and improve womens' literacy are truly laudable and worthy of this prestigious recognition.

 

Marcey Waters Named WOWS Scholar

Professor Marcey Waters has been named a WOWS, Working on Women in Science, Scholar in the College of Arts and Sciences.

Marcey Waters

The program was initiated in 2007 and the award recognizes Professor Waters role as an outstanding mentor, researcher, scholar, teacher, and leader.

 

Focus on Implicit Bias

Chemistry Professor Jeffrey Johnson was a participant in the 2nd annual Diversity Thinkposium held recently. A THINKposium is a hybrid think tank/symposium and free exchange of ideas on a particular topic. This year's daylong event, held at the Stone Center, focused on implicit bias and its effect on classroom instruction and hiring practices.

THINKPosium

Chancellor Carol L. Folt, who welcomed the more than 100 THINKposium participants, said the work they were about to undertake was vitally important. “The UNC-Chapel Hill we want is the one you are thinking about creating. It has the same level of intentionality we bring to our teaching and our research and the way we build community,” she said.

 

Women in Science and Engineering

Women in Science and Engineering, WISE, was founded in 2012 by a group of six women chemists who sought to create a discussion-based organization open to all UNC students and postdocs wanting to learn more about gender equity in STEM careers. The aim of WISE is to promote thoughtful dialogue of gender issues as they relate to scientific settings.

Women in Science and Engineering

The group holds monthly meetings focused on researching, critically analyzing, and proposing actionable remedies to a particular issue related to gender in science. Some topics covered include: stereotype threat, work/family life balance, negotiations, diversity, and the career paths of inspirational women scientists. WISE also provides platforms for community outreach, in order to educate about the real-life challenges that men and women face that arise out of inequality, misconceptions or outdated standards. The overall mission of WISE is to develop the tools to articulate these challenges in an effective manner based on current and accurate research, and to take steps to create positive change.

 

NOBBChE National Meeting

Carolina Chemistry participated in the 2013 NOBCChE Annual Conference, and had a very successful booth at the Career Fair.

NOBCChe

NOBCChE, pronounced no-be-shay, is The National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers and was incorporated in 1975. NOBCChE's mission is to build an eminent cadre of people of color in science and technology.