Department of Chemistry

Undergraduate Course Descriptions

 

070 First-Year Seminar: You Don't Have to Be a Rocket Scientist (3).
The goal of this seminar is to develop tools for extracting information from or finding flaws in news reports and popular science writing. Group work on such issues as biomass fuels, the hydrogen economy, and other alternative energy sources will develop an understanding of their economic and environmental impact.

071 First-Year Seminar: Foundations of Chemistry: A Historical and Modern Perspective (3).
Students will learn about ways in which scientists think. They will explore how new knowledge is generated and examine the impact of science on society. Topics to be considered include the nature of gases, atomic structure and radioactivity, and molecules and the development of new materials.

072 First-Year Seminar: From Imagination to Reality: Idea Entrepreneurism in Science, Business, the Arts (3).
Bringing ideas to fruition is a multistep process. In the present knowledge economy, high value is placed on individuals who both formulate new concepts and bring them to reality. This process requires a number of important skills that will be explored in this course.

073 First-Year Seminar: From Atomic Bombs to Cancer Treatments: The Broad Scope of Nuclear Chemistry (3).
A course engaging the topic of nuclear chemistry on the introductory chemistry course level (e.g., CHEM 101/102). Atomic structure, nuclear fission, and nuclear fusion processes will be introduced to provide the background necessary to understand applications of the processes. Applications discussed will include power generation, medical treatments, weapons, and more.

101 General Descriptive Chemistry I (3).
Prerequisite, MATH 110. The first course in a two-semester sequence. See also CHEM 102. Atomic and molecular structure, stoichiometry and conservation of mass, thermochemical changes and conservation of energy.

101L Quantitative Chemistry Laboratory I (1).
Pre- or corequisite, CHEM 101. Computerized data collection, scientific measurement, sensors, thermochemistry, spectroscopy, and conductometric titration. Laptop computer required. One four-hour laboratory each week.

102 General Descriptive Chemistry II (3).
Prerequisites, CHEM 101 and 101L. C- or better required in CHEM 101. The course is the second in a two-semester sequence. See also CHEM 101. Gases, intermolecular forces, solutions, reaction rates, chemical equilibria including acid-base chemistry, thermochemistry, electrochemistry.

102H Advanced General Descriptive Chemistry (3).
Prerequisite, placement credit for CHEM 101 and 101L; pre- or corequisite, MATH 231. Permission of the instructor for students lacking the prerequisites. One semester course for first-year students with strong backgrounds in chemistry and mathematics. By-examination credit for CHEM 101 and 101L is awarded upon satisfactory completion of CHEM 102H.

102L Quantitative Chemistry Laboratory II (1).
Prerequisite, CHEM 101L; pre- or corequisite, CHEM 102 or 102H. Computerized data collection, gas laws, intermolecular forces, redox reactions, chemical kinetics, and acid-base titrations. Laptop computer required. One four-hour laboratory each week.

105L Advanced Quantitative Chemistry Laboratory (1).
Pre-requisite or co-requisite, Chem 102H. Synthesis and physical studies that surpass that encountered in Chem 101L and 102L in terms of concepts considered rather than laboratory skills. Computer molecular modeling with a major focus on organic and biological important molecules.

190 Special Topics in Chemistry (3).
An undergraduate seminar course that is designed to be a participatory intellectual adventure on an advanced, emergent, and stimulating topic within a selected discipline in chemistry. This course does not count as credit towards the chemistry major.

200 Extraordinary Chemistry of Ordinary Things (3).
Prerequisite, MATH 110. Coregistration in CHEM 200 and 101L fulfills the physical and life science with a laboratory requirement (PL). This course helps students understand the chemistry behind important societal issues and the consequences of actions aimed at addressing the issues. Students who have taken CHEM 200 cannot take CHEM 101 for credit.

241 Modern Analytical Methods for Separation and Characterization (2).
Prerequisite, CHEM 102 or 102H. C- or better required in prerequisite. Analytical separations, chromatographic methods, spectrophotometry, acid-base equilibria and titrations, fundamentals of electrochemistry.

241L Laboratory in Separations and Analytical Characterization of Organic and Biological Compounds (1).
Prerequisite, CHEM 102L; pre- or corequisite, CHEM 241 or 241H. Applications of separation and spectrophotometric techniques to organic compounds, including some of biological interest. One three-hour laboratory each week.

245L Honors Laboratory in Separations and Analytical Characterization of Organic and Biological Compounds (1).
Prerequisite, CHEM 102L; pre- or corequisite, CHEM 241H. Applications of separation and spectrophotometric techniques to samples from the real world, including some of biological interest. Final portion of course consists of group research projects presented to the Department of Chemistry in poster session format. Honors equivalent of CHEM 241L. One three-hour laboratory each week.

251 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry (2).
Prerequisite, CHEM 102 or 102H. C- or better required in prerequisite. Chemical periodicity, introductory atomic theory and molecular orbital theory, structure and bonding in solids, descriptive nonmetal chemistry, structures and reactions of transition metal complexes, applications of inorganic complexes and materials.

261 Introduction to Organic Chemistry I (3).
Prerequisite, CHEM 102 or 102H. C- or better required in prerequisite. Molecular structure and its determination by modern physical methods, correlation between structure and reactivity and the theoretical basis for these relationships, classification of reaction types exhibited by organic molecules using as examples molecules of biological importance.

262 Introduction to Organic Chemistry II (3).
Prerequisite, CHEM 261 or 261H. C- or better required in prerequisite. Continuation of CHEM 261, with particular emphasis on the chemical properties of organic molecules of biological importance.

262L Laboratory in Organic Chemistry (1).
Prerequisites, CHEM 102L, and CHEM 241L or 245L; pre- or corequisite, CHEM 262 or 262H. Continuation of CHEM 241L or 245L with particular emphasis on organic chemistry synthesis protocols, separation techniques, and compound characterization using modern spectroscopic instrumentation. This course serves as an organic chemistry laboratory for premedical and predental students. One three-hour laboratory each week.

263L Honors Laboratory in Organic Chemistry (1).
Prerequisites, CHEM 102L, and CHEM 241L or 245L; pre- or corequisite, CHEM 262H. Permission of the instructor for students lacking CHEM 262H. Continuation of CHEM 245L with particular emphasis on organic chemistry synthesis protocols, separation techniques, and compound characterization using modern spectroscopic instrumentation. An organic chemistry laboratory for premedical and predental students. Honors equivalent of CHEM 262L. One three-hour laboratory each week.

395 Research in Chemistry for Undergraduates (3).
Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. For advanced majors in chemistry and in the applied science curriculum who wish to conduct a research project in collaboration with a faculty supervisor. Restricted to on-campus work. Work done in CHEM 395 may be counted toward honors in chemistry by petition to the honors committee of the department.

397 Special Problems in Chemistry (1-3).
Permission of the director of undergraduate studies. Literature or lab work equivalent of one to three hours each week.