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The Crimmins Group

The Crimmins Group

The Crimmins Group focuses on new methods development for the stereoselective construction of complex biologically active natural products. Most specifically, titanium enolates of acyloxazolidinethiones and acylthiazolidinethiones can be utilized in the enantio- and diastereoselective formation of beta-hydroxy acid derivatives and alpha, beta-hydroxy acid derivatives through chiral auxiliary-controlled aldol additions. All possible diastereomers can be accessed through slight modifications of reaction conditions. These diastereoselective aldol reactions can be applied to the construction of polyketide natural products such as apoptolidin, sorangicin A, irciniastatin A, and iriomoteolide A. Additionally, incorporation of a terminal alkene into the aldehyde and acyloxazolidinethione allows for the ultimate construction of medium ring ethers by means of ring-closing metathesis. Utilization of this strategy recently culminated in the enantioselective synthesis of the complex ladder toxin Brevetoxin A.

 

The Allbritton Group

Allbritton Group

Biological assays have dramatically improved in recent years due to the increasing use of living cells as "test tubes" for research studies. These cell-based assays have demanded that new technologies be developed for the life sciences in order to fully exploit the potential of designer drugs, stem cell engineering, and genetic medicine. The Allbritton Group is at the forefront of this technology development for biomedical and pharmaceutical research.

Micropallet Technology
In the area of cloning for cancer and stem cell studies, the Allbritton group demonstrated a novel and effective approach for the isolation of specific, single cells from a population of cells. Using principles borrowed from the electronics industry, microengineered arrays of extremely small structures (30 – 50 microns) termed micropallets are fabricated on the surface of a microscope slide. A laser is used to detach an individual micropallet and its attached cell from the slide whereupon it is collected. This strategy has been demonstrated for single-cell isolation with unprecedented survival and colony forming ability of single cells (>85%), thus dramatically improving the cloning process. This tool is now under development in an NIH-funded project with Mike Ramsey in the Department of Chemistry and colleagues in the Lineberger Cancer Center's Animal Models Facility to improve the process for creating genetically modified mice for medical research.

 

Contact Information

AREA CONTACT PHONE
Administration Ruth Hyde 919-962-2173
Accounting & Sponsored Research Karen Holmes 919-962-1189
Human Resources Nancy Ray 919-962-2174
Karen Gilliam 919-843-3452
Student Services Graduate Inquiries 919-843-7827
Undergraduate Inquiries 919-843-7826
Technical Support & Facilities Peter White 919-962-1689
Technology Development/Industry Liason Joonhyung Cho 919-843-3165
Undergraduate Laboratories Nita Eskew 919-962-4796
Mathew Steadman 919-843-7218
Kathleen Coughlin 919-962-5571
Web Content & Information Management Lars Sahl 919-962-6193
General Inquiries   919-843-7100
Fax   919-962-2388

 

Department Mailing Address

Department of Chemistry
Campus Box 3290
Caudill and Kenan Laboratories
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290

 

Department Shipping Addresses

Kenan Laboratories, Room#
Department of Chemistry
125 South Road
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290

 

Caudill Laboratories, Room#
Department of Chemistry
131 South Road
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290

 

Venable Hall or Murray Hall, Room#
Department of Chemistry
123 South Road
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290

 

Chapman Hall, Room#
Department of Chemistry
205 S Columbia St
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290

 

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