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The Allbritton Group

Allbritton Group

Biological assays have dramatically improved in recent years due to the increasing use of living cells as "test tubes" for research studies. These cell-based assays have demanded that new technologies be developed for the life sciences in order to fully exploit the potential of designer drugs, stem cell engineering, and genetic medicine. The Allbritton Group is at the forefront of this technology development for biomedical and pharmaceutical research.

Microanalytic Technologies
Traditional biochemical assays have limitations when used for assays in cells obtained from patients; therefore, the Allbritton Group has worked to develop new technologies that address critical needs for biochemical studies within live cells. The laboratory has pioneered advanced tools for analytical chemistry that now make it feasible to perform enzyme assays in individual cells taken directly from patients. In collaboration with colleagues David Lawrence and Marcey Waters in the Department of Chemistry and colleagues in the School of Medicine, the group is developing new chemical compounds that will act to report the abnormal behavior of specific enzymes in blood or biopsy specimens. This cell-by-cell measurement of enzyme activity in patients will have widespread value for individualizing or customizing patient therapy and will provide critical information for physicians using the new generation of molecularly targeted drugs used in the treatment of patients with cancer, autoimmune syndromes, neurodegenerative disorders, and a variety of other diseases.

 

The Ashby Group

The Ashby Group

Members of the Ashby Group focus on the synthesis of functionalized materials with applications ranging from biology to alternative energy. We synthesize degradable polyester based material to take advantage of their enhanced biocompatibility and high degree of physical and chemical control. The materials we have synthesized range in applications from cell scaffolds to degradable shape memory devices.

A need in current biomaterials is the integration of functional groups into degradable polymers to impart properties for specialized applications. Two methods we employ utilize cyclization chemistry through "click" type reactions and Diels-Alder chemistry to integrate polar groups into a polyester backbone. Group members are also investigating functionalization chemistry based on aminooxy coupling reactions.

 

Contact Information

AREA CONTACT PHONE
Administration Ruth Hyde 919-962-2173
Accounting & Sponsored Research Karen Holmes 919-962-1189
Human Resources Nancy Ray 919-962-2174
Karen Gilliam 919-843-3452
Student Services Graduate Inquiries 919-843-7827
Undergraduate Inquiries 919-843-7826
Technical Support & Facilities Peter White 919-962-1689
Technology Development/Industry Liason Joonhyung Cho 919-843-3165
Undergraduate Laboratories Nita Eskew 919-962-4796
Mathew Steadman 919-843-7218
Kathleen Coughlin 919-962-5571
Web Content & Information Management Lars Sahl 919-962-6193
General Inquiries   919-843-7100
Fax   919-962-2388

 

Department Mailing Address

Department of Chemistry
Campus Box 3290
Caudill and Kenan Laboratories
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290

 

Department Shipping Addresses

Kenan Laboratories, Room#
Department of Chemistry
125 South Road
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290

 

Caudill Laboratories, Room#
Department of Chemistry
131 South Road
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290

 

Venable Hall or Murray Hall, Room#
Department of Chemistry
123 South Road
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290

 

Chapman Hall, Room#
Department of Chemistry
205 S Columbia St
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290

 

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